200 Series Toyota Landcruiser Dual Battery System Options

Hi, Andrew here from Accelerate Auto, Electrics and Air Conditioning. I just had a look down in my workshop and realised we’ve got five 200 Series Toyota Landcruisers getting fit outs today.

It’s actually not that uncommon for us at the moment. So I thought that we’d do a quick video, we’d do a runaround, and then this afternoon, we’ll show you what we’ve been busy doing today.

200 Series Toyota Landcruiser Dual Battery System – Install #1

This is one of the ones that we’ve finished today. This one’s had pretty much one of the most common jobs we do to these 200’s.

What we’ve done today is we’ve installed a second battery using a genuine second Toyota tray. This is actually the version that only came out with one battery, if you know. So we’ve used the genuine second tray in the other side.

And we generally end up installing some kind of light bar or spot lights.

We’ve done a few of them. I’ll show you them later, but this has got the Titan Light Bar on it. We’ve installed that today.

We’ve installed the REDARC BCDC1240. We’ll show you some close ups of that mounted behind the grill to help its cooling.

We’ve installed an RACQ Deep Cycle Battery on this one. The reason why is the customer’s a tourer, and obviously with RACQ, nationwide warranty, no better battery for a tourer out there. Doesn’t have all the bells and whistles, but will definitely do its job, and anywhere you are in Australia, you won’t have an issue.

We’ve also installed Anderson Plug that we’ll show you down the rear, and various outlets in the back.

As I said before, we’ve used the factory Toyota tray. We do this ’cause one thing that’s very important with these systems is to use at least 105 amp hour battery.

There are other systems around where they fit a smaller battery up in the back corner. You just do not get the fridge run time that everybody’s looking for. With 105, you’ll get at least two to three days, and it’s really what you need in a system.

So whenever you’re looking at any different 200 Series dual-battery system, always ensure that you’re gonna get at least 100 or 105 amp hour battery, and then it’s very important with them. We have a lot of customers who are disappointed with the performance when they use a smaller battery.

Okay, so here we are down the back of the car. The main reason why we installed this dual-battery system is so the customer can run his fridge and charge various things at the back here. So the reason why we’ve got four outlets is we’ve got a cigarette socket, and Engel and a USB socket, and a volt meter to top it off.

Okay, so one other thing we’ve done on this vehicle is they come out with a factory cigarette lighter that’s obviously wired to ignition.

We’ve replaced that cigarette lighter with a dual-USB port that’s actually wired to the auxiliary battery permanent power, so that means you can charge your iPads and so on with the ignition switched off, or anybody in the back has constant power to running any sort of devices like that while you’re travelling.

We’ve also run an Anderson Plug. The reason why I’m showing you this one is we actually use the Trailer Vision Anderson cover. It’s really neat. We don’t see many people using these, but we think it’s pretty much a necessity on the back of such a good-looking car.

200 Series Toyota Landcruiser Dual Battery System – Install #2

I’m gonna show you yet another 200 Series Toyota Landcruiser Dual Battery System fit out we’ve done today.

This one, we’ve used the Supercharge All Rounder 105 amp hour battery.  So again, that’ll give you two to three days running with your fridge in the rear. We’ve also fitted some King Spotlights.

Always a challenge, but they’re going on quite well. And this one, we’ve used the REDARC 1225 BCDC in the front. And that’s really most of it.

We’ll show you some close ups of what we’ve done in the bonnet.

Okay, and here we are down the back of the vehicle. Now, it seems to be our standard, but we keep having our customers want to do it this way and see it this way, and we keep doing it.

So what we end up doing is cigarette socket, Engel socket and then dual USB socket with a volt meter, as well. Seems to work quite well. Give customers all the options.

One thing we do a bit differently is we run a couple of separate feeds down here. You’ll find sometimes it’s easy just to run one feed and loop it all up.

What that means is if you have a problem in one circuit, everything goes, so you’ll notice up the front, there was a couple of different fuses. And that fuses this all individually.

Okay, and another touch that we’ve added to it, even though we fitted the Kings Spotlights, we actually have fitted a factory looking switch, rather than using the one supplied with the kit.

We used this and it makes it a much more professional install and actually fits in with the other switches quite well.

If you want any more information on 200 Series Toyota Landcruiser dual battery systems, light bar installations, or you have any questions in general that need to be answered, feel free to comment below, contact us online or give us a call on 1300-227-353.

All About Anderson Plugs – Colours, Sizes & Uses Explained

If you’re looking to get a dual battery system in your vehicle or you’re towing a caravan or camper trailer, chances are you have probably heard all about Anderson plugs. Put simply, an Anderson plug is a specialised plug we use to connect devices that use high-current circuits.

Sizes & Colours

Anderson plugs come in a range of sizes and colours, the most common being the grey and the red 50-amp ones. You can get up to a 350-amp. The bigger the current, the bigger the Anderson plug we need.

A red Anderson plug will only fit into a red Anderson plug. We can’t connect, basically, a red and a grey. The only real reason you’ll have the different colours is so that you always remember to connect the right accessory into the right accessory on your caravan circuit or car.

When to Use an Anderson Plug

Charging Circuits

The Anderson plug is designed to handle a high, continuous load, so this makes it ideal to use in charging circuits. The most common use that we install Anderson plugs for is charging the auxiliary battery in your caravan or camper trailer when driving.

It’s fitted to the rear of the vehicle like this one here. This is the ideal alternative to running a charge feed through your 12-pin plug. Too much current charging through a 12-pin plug can cause the pins to melt as they’re not large enough to handle the current from most modern alternators. Having an Anderson plugs means you can safely pass more charge through to your caravan’s battery charge system, keeping the caravan batteries charged up while you travel to your next destination.

Solar Panel Connection

Another common use for Anderson plugs is to connect a solar panel via a regulator to top up your batteries. We often fit these to four-wheel drives and caravans with dual battery systems in an easy to access location so they could easily top up their auxiliary batteries via the solar panel without having to run your vehicle.

Powering ESC (Electronic Stability Control)

We’ll also regularly fit another Anderson plug to your tow bar if you’ve got a caravan that requires power to ESC, which is electronic stability control. Although your ESC can be run through a 12-pin if necessary, we recommend using an Anderson plug because it’s a more secure connection when driving, and ease of disconnection if you’re going off-road. It’s common practice to use a red Anderson plug for ESC and a grey one for your charge feed on the back of your car so you can easily identify them.

12 Volt Accessory Power Alternative

Due to their secure locking design, Anderson plugs also make great alternatives for powering high-draw 12-volt accessories such as fridges and air compressors. Anderson plugs are much more robust and hold a more secure connection than the standard 12-volt cigarette socket. They’re particularly good for those of us who like to venture off the beaten track.

I hope this video has given you a bit more information about what Anderson plugs are and why we recommend installing them as part of a dual battery system in your four-wheel drive, caravan, or camper trailer.

If you have any further questions about Anderson plugs, give us a call on 1300 227 353, contact us online or comment below.

Ultimate Land Rover Discovery 4 Towing Set Up

In today’s video, we feature a huge job that we completed on recently, the Ultimate Land Rover Discovery 4 Towing Setup for connecting up a new caravan. I’m gonna take you on a quick tour around it and let you know what we’ve installed.

Rear Vision Camera

The first thing that we have installed for these guys is a reverse camera. The screen for the reverse camera is mounted on the dash. Now, the camera for this is actually on the caravan. What this allows them to do is, while driving they can see behind you and it gives them the vision to see right behind the caravan and usually the two lanes either side. It’s fantastic when you’re driving on the freeway and need to overtake or merging lanes. You can see everything behind you. They are absolutely awesome and one of the must-haves I think when you have a caravan.

Electric Brake Controller

Next up, we have installed an electronic brake controller. As usual, we recommend the REDARC TowPro Elite. You can mount little dial for these anywhere. These guys have opted to have it mounted just down under the steering column.

Camera Feed & Trailer Plugs

At the rear of the vehicle, we’ve got several plugs that we’ve installed. The first one is what connects the camera. This plugs into the camera on the caravan and makes it work on the screen in the car. That tucks away neatly in here and we’ve got a plate that goes over the top of it.

The next one is the 12-pin plug. This connects everything in the vehicle to the caravan, so you turn your indicators on in the car, it’ll work the indicators in the caravan, also for brake lights and various other things.

We then fitted two Anderson plugs here. We’ve got the grey one and that charges the batteries in the caravan while you’re driving. This is a really great option so that you know when you arrive on site that the batteries are fully charged so you can set up to free camp and that sort of thing.

We’ve also now got a red Anderson plug here. We use the different colours to differentiate between what you need to connect to them. Red will only connect to red, grey will only connect to grey. And this one hooks up the electronic stability and control or the ESC. That is computerised technology that improves a vehicle’s stability by detecting and reducing the loss of traction or skidding. That means that the caravan that they have purchased is equipped with that. It doesn’t come standard with most caravans on the road.

That’s pretty much it, a really simple overview of this Land Rover Discovery 4 and the towing setup that we’ve done for it. If you do need any help or advice on what to set up in your car or caravan, you can give us a call on 1300 227 353 or comment below.

2 Top Reasons to get a Rear Vision Camera for Towing

If you are looking for a little more safety and peace of mind when you’re on the road travelling, we recommend installing a Rear Vision Camera for towing. The more visibility you have whilst reversing and driving, especially when towing a caravan or trailer, the safer it is for you, your passengers and other road users. This is why we recommend rear vision cameras for anyone that is looking to tow a caravan, camper trailer, horse float or any other trailer with their vehicle.

Rear vision or reversing cameras are becoming more common as a standard feature in modern vehicles. In fact, America has just recently introduced legislation to make reversing cameras a mandatory safety feature in all new vehicles.

When towing in particular, we recommend setting up dual rear vision camera’s. One on the rear of the car. This is great to use when you are hooking up the caravan or trailer as it allows you to see the tow ball/hitch. We recommend a second (dual) camera installed on the back of your caravan.

IMPORTANT NOTE ON DRIVER AWARENESS: It is possible for drivers to become over-reliant on reverse technology. while technology will greatly improve reversing and road safety, it should not replace active supervision!

Having a rear vision camera for towing can help in two main ways:

1. Increased visibility when driving

Now that you have your caravan hooked up, the total length of vehicle and caravan is usually more than double the vehicle. Which means you now have bigger blind spots. With a rear vision camera fitted to your caravan, you can leave the camera on while driving. This majorly improves visibility when merging or overtaking, very useful for highway driving!

2. Assistance for tight manoeuvring.

We’ve all been there – trying to get the caravan into a tight spot at a caravan park before the sun sets, narrowly avoiding a disagreement between driver and spotter. Well, with a camera on the rear of the caravan, this allows you to see behind the van and reverse it into that tight spot easily. Hopefully saving a few arguments in the process. 😉

Bonus Tips for Reversing Your Caravan

If you have recently purchased a caravan and don’t have much experience towing or manoeuvring, here are some quick tips for reversing. 

1. Take it Slow

If you are moving at a slower pace, you will have more time to make minor steering adjustments before you get yourself in an undesirable situation. Patience is critical, especially if you are new to the whole experience.

2. Use Your Mirrors 

Use your left and right mirrors to monitor the rear corners of the trailer, this will give you an indication of any trailer change in direction. If you see too much of the trailer on one side, turn the wheel towards that mirror to straighten up.

4. Shift Your Hands to Turn

Move your hands from the top of the steering wheel to the bottom. Moving your hands to the left will now move the caravan to the left and vice versa. Once you have established the right amount of turn, straighten up to the point where the vehicle follows the caravan on the same arc.

 

5. Getting out of a jackknife: 

If you end up in a jackknife position, there are a few things to do to get out of it.

  1. Stop immediately before you cause any damage.
  2. Turn the steering full lock away from the angle of the jackknife.
  3. Move forward slowly and this will straight the combination very quickly.

6. Reversing into a Caravan Site: 

When reverse parking, take it slow and if you can, set up markers to simplify your parking.

  1.     Remove your Weight Distribution Bars prior to reversing into the parking bay.
  2.     Identify any hazards in or around your site.
  3.     Take it slowly and use a spotter (or rear vision camera) to stop you from hitting anything or cause damage.

For more tips on Reversing a Caravan, check out this great article from Caravanning with Kids >> Caravan Reversing Tips for Newbies <<

For more information on Rear Vision Cameras for towing, click here

The specialised team at Accelerate Auto Electrics are more than happy to assist with any inquiries that you may have regarding Rear Vision cameras for towing your caravan or camper trailer. Get in touch with us on 07 5479 6652 or contact us here!

Ford Everest Towing Upgrade

Ford Everest Towing Upgrade

Ford Everest Towing Upgrade

Good afternoon everyone, Briohny here from Accelerate Auto Electrics & Air Conditioning on the beautiful Sunshine Coast.

Today we’re gonna take you through a job that we’ve done on this Ford Everest. We’ve installed a Redarc TowPro Elite and an Anderson plug.

The reason we love the Redarc TowPro Elite is that rather than having a big box that sits under the steering column and you usually knock your knees on it, instead you’ve got a little dial that we’ve mounted really nicely into the dash here next to the gearstick and that way when you need to reach it in an emergency it’s right close and handy.

For all the other reasons that we love the Redarc TowPro Elite, check out one of our other videos that we’ll link in the descriptions below.

So under the bonnet, we’ve got a 50 Amp midi fuse and a 30 Amp circuit breaker. We’re also running 8 B&S cable that goes directly from the battery through to the rear of the car that hooks up to the Anderson plug.

We’ve then got 5 mm cable that goes from the battery into here where it then shoots off to the dial for the Redarc controller and then goes straight to the back again into the trailer plug.

So at the rear of the vehicle here, we’ve got the Anderson plug that we’ve installed.

If you need any help with towing your caravan or trailers, you can give us a call on 1300-227-353, email us at ‘[email protected]’, or comment below.