Where Can I Fit a Dual Battery System?

Depending on your vehicle, there are a few options when it comes to where you can fit a dual battery system. Today we’re gonna run you through the most popular options to fit a dual battery system and which common vehicles they are best suited to.

Under Bonnet

So, first up, let’s chat about an under bonnet dual battery system. This option involves fitting two batteries under the bonnet of your vehicle. In some cases, the vehicle actually comes with two starting batteries as standard. In this situation, we’d replace both batteries, one would be replaced with a high-powered starting battery and the other would be replaced with an auxiliary or dual battery.

In other cases, if the vehicle comes standard with one starting battery and an empty space somewhere for a second battery, we would leave the starting battery and fit an auxiliary or dual battery in an empty space under the bonnet.

Under bonnet has to use a deep cycle usually calcium type of battery. For most people, the under bonnet is an ideal dual battery solution as it keeps the auxiliary battery out of the way without having to take up space somewhere in the vehicle.

Under bonnet systems can be fitted to a number of popular four-wheel drives including the Toyota Landcruiser Prado, or Hilux, a Nissan Navara, a Ford Ranger PJ or PK, the Holden Colorado and Rodeo the Isuzu D-MAX and MU-X, some Jeep Wranglers and Cherokees and VW Amaroks.

Under Tray or Canopy

Next up is a great solution for a ute. The under tray or canopy setup. This is quite a popular option for people who have a ute with canopies or under tray storage as it keeps your battery locked away without taking up space in the cab of the vehicle.

The versatility of this option is what makes it so popular. With so many options for sizes and types of batteries on the market today, there are very few limits to what type of system we can install under the tray or in a canopy.

The main downside of this setup is that you will lose some storage space in your canopy or in your tray. This is where our next and newest option comes in.

In-Cab

We have recently developed an in-cab dual battery solution for utes and dual cab vehicles that is our best space saver yet.

This system involves fitting a lead crystal battery behind the rear seats of dual cab utes. This frees up the entire canopy or tray and allows for a more secure and protected dual battery system. We can customise the location of plugs and sockets, put them anywhere in the vehicle and also fit anything else that you may need.

Due to the design and size requirements, this type of system is limited to a select group of vehicles. At the moment we can put this in the Ford Ranger and Mazda BT-50s.

If you have a different vehicle, get in touch, we’ll do some measurements and see if it’s a suitable option for you. If you want to know a bit more about our in-cab dual battery solutions, check out another video here:

Portable Battery Box

As awesome as these three in-vehicle systems are, they do have one major drawback, you need have the vehicle close by to power everything. This isn’t so bad when you’re parked up in one spot for a while but if you want a bit more freedom, this is where our final option comes in.

The portable battery box.

There are so many variations of portable battery boxes on the market. There are pre-made boxes with all the outlets and sockets you will ever need and maybe some that you never actually will use. However, if you’re after something a little bit more suited to your specific needs, we have a range of custom portable battery boxes available.

We have four standard options available that are assembled in house. Or you can choose to have one made that is completely customised with the sockets and plugs that you need and the isolator or DC-to-DC charger of your choice. The main benefit of a portable battery box is that it’s portable.

You can remove the box from your vehicle and set it up in camp to run a fridge or lights. Perfect for those who like to venture further off the beaten track.

So, these are the most common options available for where you can fit a dual battery system.

Which one do you prefer?

Let us know in the comments below. If you’ve got any other questions, you can give us a call, 1300 227 353 or contact us online.

ULTIMATE Off-Grid/Free Camping Caravan Power System

Want to run your air conditioning overnight in your caravan while camping off the grid? You heard it right, running air con without 240 power. Keep watching and we’ll show you how with a Free Camping Caravan Power System.

Hi there, Andrew here from Accelerate Auto Electrics & Air Conditioning on the Sunshine Coast. Today we’re very excited to show you through, this On The Move, No Limits caravan that we have just finished installing a power packed, Enerdrive Lithium power system in.

Original System

This caravan came to us with 3x 125Ah AGM batteries in it, and Enerdrive Combo 1600W charger inverter, and a Projecta DCDC charger. It was only wired up and capable of running a microwave and a couple of power points. The batteries, inverter, and DCDC charger were all too small to run the air con system.

New System

This new setup is a custom free camping caravan power system that is built by us, and Enerdrive, and includes two 300Ah compact lithium batteries, an Enerdrive Combi 2000W inverter charger.

The custom Enerdrive base plate. Two 40A DC-DC chargers. And an Enerdrive ePRO Plus battery monitor. The other thing we’ve done, is we’ve fitted 890 watts of solar on the roof and a Dometic Harrier Inverter air conditioner.

Let’s take a closer look at all of the components inside.

Solar Panels

We’ll start up top with the solar panel. The caravan already had two 120 watt panels on the roof, it also had the air con unit, satellite dish, couple of TV antennas, so we had to play Tetris to get all the panels there.

It now has nine separate panels including the two existing ones, totaling 890 watts. The nine solar panels flow into the Morning Star 60 Amp controller. The whole system is installed under these seats in the rear of the van.

Batteries

We’ve installed two 300Ah compact lithium batteries, giving the caravan a whopping 600Ah of lithium. That is equivalent to 850Ah of AGM batteries. So there’s a few reasons why we use these lithium batteries in these type of fit outs. Lithium-ion batteries have a high energy density and are perfect for cyclic applications.

They offer savings of up to 70% in volume and weight compared to traditional lead acid or AGM batteries. Lithium-ion batteries also offer fast charging and discharging, high efficiency and three times as many charging cycles, up to 1500 cycles compared to traditional AGM lead acid batteries.

To give you an example of the weight saving, you would need to have seven 125Ah AGM batteries installed in a caravan to get the equivalent run time for the air con system. The weight of that many AGM batteries, would be 241 kilos, in comparison, these two lithium batteries, weigh less than a hundred kilos. Don’t forget about the space saving too, I don’t know many caravans that could fit  all these AGM batteries underneath the seat.

Active Cell Balancing

A feature that these lithium batteries have that is exclusive to Enerdrive is the Active Cell Balancing. In layman’s terms, the battery is made up of individual cells, and over time, these cells get out of balance with each other.

Enerdrive has a magic black box, that allows for automatic balancing of the cells during charging, discharging, and storage. Any cells with high voltage density will transfer energy to the lower cells in the pack, which will increase longevity of the batteries and limit the waste of stored energy.

Combi Inverter Charger

Down here, we have the Enerdrive ePRO Combi 2000 Watt Charger Inverter. It is an all in one combination of a DC to AC pure sine wave inverter, and advanced multi-stage charger, and a high-speed AC transfer switch.

The main task of the ePRO Combi Inverter Charger is to act as an uninterruptible AC power supply or UPS. In case of disconnecting the van from 240 volt, the ePRO Combi immediately stops charging the battery, releases the AC transfer switch, and activates an inverter to take over supply of all the connected loads.

Basically, this inverter is what runs all the 240 volt appliances like the air conditioning system, the microwave and the power points. So you could pretty much plug anything into this thing, like kettle, toaster, coffee maker, hair straightener, even the washing machine.

So basically this charger will charge the batteries even when it’s connecting power supply into 240 volt, so it’s got load sharing. When free camping and you’re not plugged into 240 power, the inverter takes the power stored in the batteries, turns it into 240 volt, to run the appliances.

DC-DC Chargers

Next up, we’ll take a closer look at these two 40A DC to DC chargers. The Enerdrive DC to DC battery charger is a fully automatic multi-stage, multi-input battery charger with the ability to charge from either alternator link to a battery, or via the solar panel.

In this instance, we’re only using it as a DCDC charger, because we’re gonna use a separate Morning Star solar regulator. The reason for that is, so when you’re driving, we can charge from both the Anderson plug alternator, and from the solar panels. The reason why we’ve got two of these DCDC chargers is ’cause, we’ve packed them parallel together, we can get up to 80A of charging, while driving. So basically, these batteries can take a lotta hit, and these chargers can give it to ’em. The Anderson plug connects straight to these DCDC chargers, and they manage the whole lithium profile.

Battery Management System

We’ve worked closely with the team in Enerdrive in Brisbane to have this system fully customised to suit this caravan and customer’s needs. Prior to the van coming in, all the measurements are sent to Enerdrive and they build a battery management system connection plate, in their factory, in Brisbane. This is basically a plate that is built in the factory and shipped to us for installation. All the individual circuits are fused and clearly labelled and that this handles all the charging, discharging, and fusing for the system.

Battery Monitor

Over here on the wall, we’ve mounted the ePRO Plus battery monitor and alarm. The battery monitor shows you the true state of charge of your system, it’s like a fuel gauge for your battery, telling you how long until the system shuts down, the hours and minutes, and also the current load going in and out.

The ePRO Plus can monitor up to three battery banks. We also have set up two alarms, the first will shut the system down at 24% capacity, the second, is to shut the AC off when the batteries get down to 35% capacity. That allows the fridges and all the other important things to keep running overnight, once the air con shuts down, so that no problems happen. We can expand it up to another three alarms, so for example we could turn the washing machine off at 30%, or lights at 28% or something like that.

So all in all, this is a pretty epic system, it’s not often I geek out. And one for the serious tourers out there who want the creature comforts, powered appliances like you’d have in your home. If you are interested in upgrading to a lithium system for your caravan, or have any questions about getting a free camping caravan power system, feel free to comment below, send us an email, or give us a call on 1300 227 353.

All About Anderson Plugs – Colours, Sizes & Uses Explained

If you’re looking to get a dual battery system in your vehicle or you’re towing a caravan or camper trailer, chances are you have probably heard all about Anderson plugs. Put simply, an Anderson plug is a specialised plug we use to connect devices that use high-current circuits.

Sizes & Colours

Anderson plugs come in a range of sizes and colours, the most common being the grey and the red 50-amp ones. You can get up to a 350-amp. The bigger the current, the bigger the Anderson plug we need.

A red Anderson plug will only fit into a red Anderson plug. We can’t connect, basically, a red and a grey. The only real reason you’ll have the different colours is so that you always remember to connect the right accessory into the right accessory on your caravan circuit or car.

When to Use an Anderson Plug

Charging Circuits

The Anderson plug is designed to handle a high, continuous load, so this makes it ideal to use in charging circuits. The most common use that we install Anderson plugs for is charging the auxiliary battery in your caravan or camper trailer when driving.

It’s fitted to the rear of the vehicle like this one here. This is the ideal alternative to running a charge feed through your 12-pin plug. Too much current charging through a 12-pin plug can cause the pins to melt as they’re not large enough to handle the current from most modern alternators. Having an Anderson plugs means you can safely pass more charge through to your caravan’s battery charge system, keeping the caravan batteries charged up while you travel to your next destination.

Solar Panel Connection

Another common use for Anderson plugs is to connect a solar panel via a regulator to top up your batteries. We often fit these to four-wheel drives and caravans with dual battery systems in an easy to access location so they could easily top up their auxiliary batteries via the solar panel without having to run your vehicle.

Powering ESC (Electronic Stability Control)

We’ll also regularly fit another Anderson plug to your tow bar if you’ve got a caravan that requires power to ESC, which is electronic stability control. Although your ESC can be run through a 12-pin if necessary, we recommend using an Anderson plug because it’s a more secure connection when driving, and ease of disconnection if you’re going off-road. It’s common practice to use a red Anderson plug for ESC and a grey one for your charge feed on the back of your car so you can easily identify them.

12 Volt Accessory Power Alternative

Due to their secure locking design, Anderson plugs also make great alternatives for powering high-draw 12-volt accessories such as fridges and air compressors. Anderson plugs are much more robust and hold a more secure connection than the standard 12-volt cigarette socket. They’re particularly good for those of us who like to venture off the beaten track.

I hope this video has given you a bit more information about what Anderson plugs are and why we recommend installing them as part of a dual battery system in your four-wheel drive, caravan, or camper trailer.

If you have any further questions about Anderson plugs, give us a call on 1300 227 353, contact us online or comment below.

How to Get the Most Out of Your AGM Battery

Want to get the most out of your deep cycle AGM battery?

Hi guys, Andrew here from Accelerate Auto Electrics & Air Conditioning on the Sunshine Coast.

Knowing how to correctly charge and look after your deep cycle AGM battery is crucial for optimising its performance and life span. In today’s video, we’re gonna run you through few of our tips on how to correctly use and maintain your deep cycle AGM battery.

Now just to clarify, these tips only apply to the AGM deep cycle and not your starting battery. Starting batteries are a completely different composition and are design to be used or maintained in a very different way.

So now that we’ve got the disclaimer out of the way, let’s get into the good stuff.

Discharging

Okay, so let’s get into discharging, first up. If you want this guy to live a while, the last thing you want to do is discharge it too much or run it too flat. Basically, the lower the depth of discharge you take it to, the shorter its life span is gonna be.

We recommend trying not to go below 11 volts. Anything below 11 volts and you’re really causing damage to the battery. Any sort of dual battery system we wire up, we’ll always recommend using a low volt, some sort of low voltage cut out or protection system to stop this guy getting discharged too much.

Storage

Now that we’ve covered discharging, a second thing really is storage. When you store the battery, you always want to store it at a fully charged state. If you leave the AGM battery stored for a long period of time, say anything over a month in a discharged state, sulphation will always occur.

We’ll go into sulphation a bit later, but just remember, if you want this guy to last a long time, fully charge it before you store it for any amount of time.

Charging

Okay, we covered discharging, we’ve covered storage, let’s talk about charging. An AGM battery has a different internal resistance to your old school battery and it also requires a different charging method.

Whenever you charge an AGM battery, you really need a late model multistage charger. A charger that will go through an absorption, bulk and float phase.

The old charger you got, the old Arlec one that you’ve probably got in the back, will just cook this guy and destroy it and turn it into a balloon. So, whenever you charge this guy, you want to look for a modern battery charger that has an AGM setting or will detect an AGM, and shows a multistage curve. You’ll generally see five, seven to 11 stages are normally covered by your good brand chargers.

When it’s in the vehicle, it’s a different chemistry to your normal starting battery. So, your alternator isn’t really designed to charge this style of battery. Whenever you fit an AGM deep cycle battery to a vehicle, we always recommend using a DC-DC charger that again, either detects the AGM battery or can be modified to suit the AGM battery.

It requires a different charge rate your normal start battery. A DC-DC charger generally will always protect the start battery against any discharge on the AGM battery. So, the old VSR solenoid that people used to use, not such a good idea. These guys, DCDC charger, and you’ll get a much longer life span out of them.

Sulphation – Enemy of the AGM Battery

Sulphation occurs when sulfuric acid within the lead acid battery reacts to a lead sulphate on the battery’s negative plates. This reduces the surface area of the acid on the plate and makes it difficult for the battery to hold charge. The best way to prevent sulphation, once again, is to leave this guy fully charged.

We hope these tips have helped you understand how to correctly use and maintain your deep cycle AGM battery.

If you have any further questions about battery care and maintenance, give us a call on 1300 227 353, or email us at [email protected] or you can even comment below.

Campsite Review: Habitat Noosa Everglades Ecocamp

Campsite Review: Habitat Noosa Everglades Ecocamp

Hey guys! Bridie here from Accelerate Auto Electrics, hope you’re ready for this rollercoaster camping trip. This campsite review will be a little different as I’m a rookie camper. But nonetheless, I’m excited to share my first camping experience with everyone!

I’ll even share with you what went wrong! Hopefully, you learn from my mistakes and get a laugh out of it.

Getting There

Getting there was a breeze! I was coming from Caloundra which is about an hour away, but keep in mind travel time will depend on traffic and roadworks. The campsite is located 20 Minutes out of Noosa at Lake Cootharaba. No need to go off the beaten track until you arrive at the campgrounds. There you drive along a dirt road, but nothing my little car (a 2wd) couldn’t tackle!

Accommodation Options

Habitat Noosa Everglades Ecocamp has all the accommodation options covered

 

Camping

What we loved

  • Location, Location, Location – We grabbed a beautiful spot right on the lake, surrounded by nature and the beach is close by.
  • Bar and Bistro – Great for families and relaxing with some friends!
  • Amenities – modern and clean
  • Accommodation options – There are plenty of accommodation options for all kinds of campers, even glamping!
  • Walking tracks – There are heaps of walking tracks to choose from. Although I didn’t personally do one because I spent all my time at the beach, I did see a lot of people putting on their hiking shoes and heading into the bush.
  • Kid Friendly – There was a lot of kids riding around on their bikes, kicking a soccer ball or running around the campsite!
  • Watercraft Hire – You can hire out watercraft for the day and jump in the lake to cool down.

Room for improvement

  • Signage – Getting there in the night was difficult as we couldn’t see any signs to say where the campsite was, we couldn’t even see the entrance. We just took a wild guess and drove down a dirt road and luckily it turned out to be the right one! There were limited signs at the campsite which made it difficult to find our way around. Note: There is a big Habitat Noosa sign on entrance, but due to its colour, you may not be able to see this at night.
  • Showers – Not so much a ‘room for improvement’ but just to note, the showers are solar powered. This means you will not get any hot water until the sun starts coming in. Best to shower at night or late in the afternoon.

Things to do

There are plenty of things you can do down at the Habitat Noosa! Check out the list below

  1. Historical Nature Walks! There’s a range of great walking tracks easily accessible from the eco-camp.  Click here for more information
  2. Free shuttle bus to Noosa – Noosa is the perfect location to sit back and relax, you may as well get a free ride in.
  3. The CootharaBAR bistro & bar – Enjoy an uninterrupted view of Lake Cootharaba with a cold beer!
  4. 65 Acres of Land – There’s plenty of room for the kids to ride their bikes, bring a soccer ball, cricket set or a frisbee.

Tours & Hire

  1. bar-b-canoe – Enjoy a canoe along the tropical rainforest waterways! Click here for more information!
  2. eco-cruise – Enjoy a historical cruiser along the river with Morning Tea and Lunch Provided! Book Here  
  3. Hire out watercraft! You can hire out Fiberglass and plastic canoes, One person and tandem sea kayaks, Waveskis, SUPs, Sailboat, Windsurfers, Motorboats (one-day advance booking required).

My Experience

Upon arrival, we struggled to find our way around the camp and find a place to pitch the tent. Thankfully, we eventually pitched up next to some amazing people who spoiled us with chocolates! WIN!

We set up our little pop-up tent (which was embarrassingly small next to campers with huge caravan setups) and then set up the gazebo. That was the hardest part because it was broken and not clicking into place. Eventually, we just stuck pegs in the holes and duct taped them up which, thankfully, actually worked.

Starting a fire was another challenge. We found that the wood we brought with us burned through very quickly and our fire didn’t last. So that made the first night pretty difficult.

Speaking generally, we didn’t have too many problems after that. We headed to Noosa the next morning and spent all day down at the beach, relaxing in the sun and window shopping. We then came back with long-burn firewood and made a great fire that burned all night!

All-in-all my first camping trip was something to remember, we made some memories, learned some lessons, and it was something we can laugh about in the future. I would have loved to stay longer because it took us a day to really get into it, so camping for only 2 nights was not enough.

My favourite part was probably the local ducks. We woke up thinking people were walking around on our tarp outside the tent but it was just some friendly ducks and they were always wandering around the campsite!

 

Camping Rookie Lessons Learned: 

  • LIGHTS – Unfortunately, we didn’t take any lights because we couldn’t find them when packing and wanted to leave because it was getting late. So this meant we spent the entire time using our phone lights to get around during the night.
  • TABLE – We didn’t have a table, which would have made eating and cooking 10x easier!
  • FOOD –  This was huge for us, we didn’t plan what we were going to eat and wasted a lot of good food. Mainly because we were nervous about using the gas cooker as we had never used it before. Now that we are confident using it though we will definitely be making use of it and cooking bacon and eggs for breakfast!
  • GOOD FIREWOOD – We grabbed a few blocks of wood and chucked them in the car and then threw in heaps of sticks and bark which we expected to burn all night, however, it only lasted about an hour. The second night however we went and bought long burn firewood and had a great fire all night!
  • CLOTHES – (THIS TIP IS ONLY FOR FIRST TIME CAMPERS LIKE MYSELF WHO DONT KNOW WHAT THEY’RE DOING.) Take camping appropriate clothes! You need warm clothes for the night time, which was fine, I had plenty of warm clothes, but the days were warm and I wish I had shorts and better shirt options but I only had a skirt for the two days. Also, very importantly, take thongs for the shower. I had to walk around barefoot in the showers, although they were very modern facilities, it wasn’t very nice. Would not recommend it.

If you also struggle with remembering all the items you need for camping, we recommend you download our free E-Book here!

It includes a checklist that every camper (especially the rookies) should read to avoid these silly mistakes. It also lists great camping sites on the Sunshine Coast, I definitely recommend giving this a read!

We will be going back to Habitat Noosa soon – is there anything else you would recommend we check out?

View our Top 10 Places to Camp Within 1hr of the Sunshine Coast